24 young cancer sufferers were educated by A group . These are.

On April 22, 2017, 24 kids armed with cameras shot to the streets of Boston.

Their assignment: go worms-eye and low, high and birds-eye, to finish a scavenger hunt. For the next five weeks, they would be sent out again and again, building an archive of photographs up.

The photographs (and struggles) were part of Pablove Shutterbugs, an arts education program for kids and teens in cancer therapy. The program was launched in 2011 from Jo Ann Thrailkill in memory of her son, Pablo, a youthful photo enthusiast who died of cancer at 2009.

“Foggy Pier” from Lily, age 11. Photo in Your Pablove Foundation. All photographs used with permission.

Learning how to take photographs while you’re going through cancer therapy might look like a nice distraction — and it does seem interesting —  but Shutterbugs is a critical education program as well, meant to educate new, technical skills.It comprises both classes in the Massachusetts College of Art and Design and real photograph assignments.

11, Lily, is among the kids. Her dad stated when she carries her camera the assurance can be seen by him. “When their picture comes out good, because of something [Lily] learned in class, I could see how thrilled she is,” Garry said in an email address.

The kids are getting a little something extra, although the app ran through May 20. A number of the photography is going to be exhibited in an art gallery in the Fort Point Arts Community.

“It is extremely fascinating,” Lily said in a single email address. “My daddy claims it took him a very long time to get anybody to check out his photographs and I am only 11 and lots of people have seen my photographs”

Here are 11 more photographs from this year’s collection of kids:

1. Zuehailey, 10 — “The Way To Be Squished by a Car”

Photo in Your Pablove Foundation.

2. Zuehailey, 10 — “Untitled”

Photo in Your Pablove Foundation.

3. Julia, 7 — “Adventures With Teddy”

Photo in Your Pablove Foundation.

4. Julia, 7 — “Egg-cellent supper!”

Photo in Your Pablove Foundation.

5. Lily, 11 — “Track to Trees”

Photo in Your Pablove Foundation.

6. Skyler, 14 — “Glow Wherever You Move”

Photo in Your Pablove Foundation.

7. Skyler, 14 — “Let the Waves Hit Your Feet and the Sand Make Your Chair”

Photo in Your Pablove Foundation.

8. Alyssa, 16 — “The Lighthouse”

Photo in Your Pablove Foundation.

9. Ronnie, 13 — “Through the Diamond”

Photo in Your Pablove Foundation.

10. Ani, 13 — “Untitled”

Photo in Your Pablove Foundation.

11. Dominic, 16 — “Untitled”

Photo in Your Pablove Foundation.

The youngsters at Pablove aren’t cancer patients who take photographs. They are photographers who are currently dealing with cancer.

Cancer sucks. There simply isn’t really any way about that. As soon as your days and weeks have been structured around doctor and therapy appointments, it can feel as if cancer becomes your whole identity.

Pablove gives some of the individuality — that feeling of service — back, by focusing on developing a ability such as photography.

The Shutterbugs program now operates in seven cities across the USA, such as Austin, New York, and San Francisco. The Pablove Foundation additionally provides funding grants for cancer research.